Taking amitriptyline for pain? – the truth about taking amitriptyline for pain

Considering taking amitriptyline for pain or migraines? When pain in your head and body is beyond the help of normal over the counter medicines, it is natural to want to ease your pain so you can function and live a normal life. Pain that can cause you to miss time from work and having to seclude yourself from loved ones needs to be addressed.

However, before you consider taking any medication it is important to consider the affect that it may have on your body even though it may relieve pain. This article is written to help the reader understand amitriptyline and its affects on pain.

What is Amitriptyline?

Amitriptyline is an antidepressant and works on the brain by affecting the nerve cells to reduce the amount of pain to the body. Amitriptyline can be effective in easing pain and migraines because it prevents chemicals in the brain from being absorbed into the nerve cells that cause pain. This can help ease depression and pain in the body.

Amitriptyline Side Effects

Unfortunately, with all medications, there can be side affects. Taking amitriptyline for pain can cause many similar side affects when taking anti-depressants. These side effects can be minor and include feeling drowsy, having a dry mouth, stomach problems including nausea, vomiting, and constipation.

The more severe side effects of amitriptyline include symptoms affecting the skin (rash or hives, swelling in the face, jaundice), the mind (hallucinations, mood changes, and panic attacks). In extreme cases it can affect your mental state and for some, can increase suicidal thoughts.

In addition to the side effects, it could take several weeks for the effectiveness of the medicine to help much less make a difference.

Before taking amitriptyline for pain, consider alternative methods for treating pain including meditation, acupuncture, massage, and other methods that can limit or avoid the use of medications that can increase other physical problems. For more information on alternative methods of pain relief, sign up for our free report, “Winning Your War Against Pain.”

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